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“A surprise from the author of Chocolat,” New York Times bestselling author Joanne M. Harris, “this pacy adult fantasy is narrated by Loki, the Norse god of fire and mischief” (Vogue).

This novel is a brilliant first-person narrative of the rise and fall of the Norse gods—retold from the point of view of the world’s ultimate trickster, Loki. A #1 bestseller in the UK, The Gospel of Loki tells the story of Loki’s recruitment from the underworld of Chaos, his many exploits on behalf of his one-eyed master, Odin, through to his eventual betrayal of the gods and the fall of Asgard itself.

Using her lifelong passion for the Norse myths, New York Times bestseller Joanne M. Harris has created a vibrant and powerful fantasy novel that the Sunday Sun recommends “to her long-standing audience with wit, style, and obvious enjoyment;” The Sunday Times claims it “lively and fun;” and The Metro adds that “Harris has enormous fun with her antihero...this mythical bad boy should beguile fans of Neil Gaiman.”

Review

"If everything you know about Loki begins and ends with the actor Tom Hiddleston, this book is for you.

The way Harris writes him, you can’t help but like him, even as he confesses to the most absurd and/or horrific deeds; well, you like him, but you wouldn’t really want to be acquainted with him—being his enemy or his friend seems equally dicey. One has to admire the author for imposing her own take on the character." ― Kirkus Reviews

" The Gospel of Loki is a charming novel, told with snark, wit and familiarity. Harris’s voice of Loki is an addictive thing, a pleasure to consume. While some may be most familiar with the Norse gods from the Marvel films, Harris draws the characters magnificently from their original inspirations and makes them her own." -- Rob Bedford ― Tor.com

About the Author

Joanne Harris is an Anglo-French author, whose books include fourteen novels, two cookbooks, and many short stories. Her work is extremely diverse, covering aspects of magical realism, suspense, historical fiction, mythology, and fantasy. In 2000, her 1999 novel Chocolat was adapted to the screen, starring Juliette Binoche and Johnny Depp. She is an honorary Fellow of St. Catharine’s College, Cambridge, and in 2013 was awarded an MBE by the Queen. Her hobbies are listed in Who’s Who as “mooching, lounging, strutting, strumming, priest-baiting, and quiet subversion.” She also spends too much time on Twitter, plays flute and bass guitar in a band first formed when she was sixteen, and works from a shed in her garden at her home in Yorkshire.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

The Gospel of Loki



LESSON 1

Fire and Ice

Never trust a ruminant.

— Lokabrenna

All of us came from fire and ice. Chaos and Order. Light and dark. In the beginning — or back in the day — there was fire coming out of a hole in the ice, bringing disruption, turmoil, and change. Change isn’t always comfortable, but it is a fact of life. And that’s where life as we know it began, as the fires of World Below pierced the ice of World Above.

Before that, there were no Middle Worlds. No gods, no Folk, no wildlife. There was only Order and Chaos then, pure and uncorrupted.

But neither Order nor Chaos is very hospitable. Perfect Order is immovable — frozen, unchanging, and sterile. Total Chaos is uncontrolled — volatile and destructive. The middle ground — basically, lukewarm water — created the perfect environment for another kind of life to emerge among the frozen Wilderlands and volcanoes erupting under the ice.

The Authorized Version goes like this, supported by the Oracle. From the meeting of Order and Chaos there came a giant being called Ymir, the father of the Ice Folk, and a cow, Audhumla, which licked at the salt that was in the ice and brought out the first man, Buri. From this I think we can all conclude that the cow was the primary instigator of everything that followed — War, Tribulation, the End of the Worlds. Lesson One: Never trust a ruminant.

Now the sons of Buri and those of Ymir hated each other from the start, and it didn’t take long for them to go to war. Buri’s three grandsons, the sons of Bór — their names were Odin, Vili, and Ve — finally killed old Ymir and made the Middle Worlds from what was left of him: the rocks from his bones, the earth from his flesh, the rivers from his steaming blood. His skull became the Firmament; his brains, the clouds; his eyebrows, the division between Inland and the Outlands.

Of course, there’s no way of proving this — let’s face it — rather unlikely hypothesis. All of the possible witnesses have disappeared, except for Odin, the Old Man, the only survivor of that war, architect and chronicler of what we now call the Elder Age and, as it happens, the only one (except for me) to have heard the fateful prophecy, delivered to him by Mimir’s Head when the Worlds were fresh and new.

Call me cynical if you like. But it all sounds a bit too convenient. The Authorized Version of events leaves out a number of details, which Creationists seem content to ignore. I personally have my doubts — not least about the giant cow — although even now you have to beware of how you express these sentiments. At one time, even to suggest that Odin’s account of things might have been metaphorical instead of literal would have resulted in cries of heresy and a good deal of personal discomfort for Yours Truly, which is why, even then, I was always careful to keep my scepticism to myself.

But that’s how religions and histories make their way into the world, not through battles and conquests, but through poems and kennings and songs, passed through generations and written down by scholars and scribes. And that’s how, five hundred years later or so, a new religion with its new god came to supplant us — not through war, but through books and stories and words.

After all, words are what remain when all the deeds have been done. Words can shatter faith, start a war, change the course of history. A story can make your heart beat faster, topple walls, scale mountains — Hey, a story can even raise the dead. And that’s why the King of Stories ended up being King of the gods, because writing history and making history are only the breadth of a page apart.

Not that there was much of that when Odin was fighting the Ice Folk. There were no runes to write with then, and nothing but rock to write upon. But metaphor or otherwise, this is as much as I believe: that the world came into being through Change, which is the servant of Chaos, and only through Change has it endured. Much like Your Humble Narrator, in fact, adapting to suit the circumstance.

The snow hare changes its coat to white to go unseen in winter. The ash tree drops its leaves in the fall, better to survive the cold. All of life does the same — even gods — turning their coats to suit the turning seasons of the world. There should be a name for that kind of thing — in fact, it should be one of my names. Let’s call it Revolution.

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Top reviews from the United States

Ratatosk
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Brilliant! Adds both lost real meaning and modern rationality to the Norse Myths
Reviewed in the United States on May 18, 2017
Harris is apparently one (along with certain Norwegian musicians) of not a lot of people who actually understand things. Stories are stories whether they were written by Harris, Snorri Sturluson, or long-dead annonymous poets. What is important is using one''s literary... See more
Harris is apparently one (along with certain Norwegian musicians) of not a lot of people who actually understand things. Stories are stories whether they were written by Harris, Snorri Sturluson, or long-dead annonymous poets. What is important is using one''s literary interpretation skills that one should have learned in school to understand the meaning. Harris uses Loki as a means to add both lost real meaning and modern rationality to the Norse Myths. For example, Loki is the offspring of two Jotuns. What does that mean, the son of two literal "giants," as in really big people? No. Jotuns are forces of nature. Thus, (p. 18-19 of the hardback) "My father was a lightning-strike and my mother was a pile of dry twigs." (Farbauti=cruel striker, therefore, lightning strike meets Laufey=leafy sprig, a.k.a. nal=needle, therefore, evergreen needles, resulting in Wildfire). Of course, even if you hit some people over the head with a book, they are still going to insist on things like literal versions of the English word giant or the whole monotheistic/poltical religion view of good vs. evil, seeing everything as a straight line rather than a circle... Anyway, Harris''s combination of understanding, excellent writing, and her own creativity keep me drawn to this book. I did not want to put it down and did not want it to end. The only things I didn''t really care for are Fenris (Fenrir) as a werewolf instead of a wolf and the intent in "Ransom." This Sigyn is so awful, I actually feel sorry for Loki; one understands why Loki is "not naturally monogamous." Trying not to give too much away, I like the whole theory behind this book and Runemarks and Runelight regarding a certain disembodied head; it works logically and adds a new perspective to the old stories. The humor of this book gets mentioned a lot in reviews, but what''s even better to me are lines like "And just for a moment, I almost believed that neither of us was lying."
26 people found this helpful
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Lori L. Fox
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A fun romp through Asgard with Loki
Reviewed in the United States on July 27, 2020
The Gospel According to Loki, by Joanne Harris, is told from the point of view in the voice of bad boy Trickster Loki. The Trickster’s captivating ability to tell a tale is almost bewitching enough to elicit an inkling of sympathy from the reader, yet anyone who has ever... See more
The Gospel According to Loki, by Joanne Harris, is told from the point of view in the voice of bad boy Trickster Loki. The Trickster’s captivating ability to tell a tale is almost bewitching enough to elicit an inkling of sympathy from the reader, yet anyone who has ever read Norse mythology knows how the story ends. Loki is never the hero. Maybe he could have been if the tale had unfolded differently, if the tables had been turned a bit in his favor. Destined to be more of a villain and an anti-hero, he is still able to persuade us to wish for a glimmer of hope at the end. Loki’s personality, cunning, and self-admiration shine through his words in this fun romp celebrating the glorious days and the final moments of Odin, Thor, Loki, and the rest of the Aesir in Asgard.
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Ash
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I LOVED this book. I thought it was funny and a great read.
Reviewed in the United States on November 3, 2015
I’ve read a lot of book based on different myths ( mostly Greek myths). I think Norse mythology has to be my favorite. Like most people I like Loki’s sarcasm and pranks he pulls. I also enjoy Tom Hiddleston’s portrays of Loki in the movies. But as far as where he came from... See more
I’ve read a lot of book based on different myths ( mostly Greek myths). I think Norse mythology has to be my favorite. Like most people I like Loki’s sarcasm and pranks he pulls. I also enjoy Tom Hiddleston’s portrays of Loki in the movies. But as far as where he came from and the rest of the background to his stories and pranks I knew little about. ( I’m a bigger fan of Odin and Freya out of all the Norse Gods)

That all being said. I LOVED this book. I thought it was funny and a great read. It brought some wonderfully funny and intriguing incite to why Loki acted the way he did and told stories from his side of things. I’m not sure how all this compares to the actual Norse myths but it did make me want to read more of the actual myths just to compare them to Loki’s versions.

You got your wonderful mythology, humor, crazy antics and of course Loki’s poor me attitude ( He really does try to make it seem like everything his did wasn’t all his fault) I found this to be a fun entertaining read. It was rather long and wasn’t one of the books I could sit and read all night but I would enjoy two to four chapters a day. When I get a chance to read all the Norse Myths I plan on revisiting this story again.
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Ginny Buhler
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Pretty meh
Reviewed in the United States on August 17, 2021
Perhaps I would have thrilled over this book if I hadn''t already read a much better take on Loki in C. Gockel''s I Bring the Fire series. As it was, Loki in this book was completely unlikable and the book really dragged. I had a very hard time finishing it at all. It''s... See more
Perhaps I would have thrilled over this book if I hadn''t already read a much better take on Loki in C. Gockel''s I Bring the Fire series. As it was, Loki in this book was completely unlikable and the book really dragged. I had a very hard time finishing it at all. It''s not technically bad, as in the writing is serviceable and there aren''t a bunch of obvious errors beyond interpretations on Norse names that I personally disagree with, but as a story...not great.
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Norse mythology from a rare point-of-view!
Reviewed in the United States on February 7, 2018
I really enjoyed this book that is written from a rare perspective. One thing I love about Norse mythology is that it was originally handed down by word-of-mouth (no written language at the time) and the tales are never exactly the same. Loki is one of my favorite... See more
I really enjoyed this book that is written from a rare perspective. One thing I love about Norse mythology is that it was originally handed down by word-of-mouth (no written language at the time) and the tales are never exactly the same. Loki is one of my favorite mythological characters, so the stories told from his point-of-view were very entertaining.

Some of the other characters were written a bit one-dimensional, but it doesn''t really distract from the read. After all, Loki is the star of the show here and his character is written very well.
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Samantha MacLeod
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Serious Mixed Feelings...
Reviewed in the United States on April 4, 2017
Wow, did I have mixed feelings about this one. I enjoyed a lot of aspects of Harris’s thoughtful, creative re-imagining of Norse mythology, but much of this novel had me cocking my head and going, “Huh?” I’ll start with the good… Many of the... See more
Wow, did I have mixed feelings about this one.

I enjoyed a lot of aspects of Harris’s thoughtful, creative re-imagining of Norse mythology, but much of this novel had me cocking my head and going, “Huh?”

I’ll start with the good…

Many of the characters are great. Sigyn is awesome.

Granted, Loki’s long-suffering wife in Harris’s novel is nothing like the Sigyn in my Loki novel. Still, this portrayal is excellent; she manages to be touching, hilarious, and just the right combination of tragic and comedic. Harris nailed it here.

Much of the world-building in this novel is also fascinating (with one exception…I’ll get there). Harris’s mythological universe is like a cross between the Eddas and Neil Gaiman’s Sandman series. And, most of the time, it really worked. I could get Ironwood Forest, the Dreaming, even the constant struggle between chaos and order.

And hey, there’s Loki!

Harris’s Loki is a convincing, heartbreaking, unreliable narrator. That’s tricky to pull off, and I commend it.

But… Not all the parts worked, and even those I liked didn’t work all the time.

It was interesting to see what aspects of Norse mythology Harris used, and what she ignored. Many of the stories – Thor as a bride, the abduction of Idunn – come straight from the text. But some things don’t; Loki’s origin, for instance. In Harris’s novel, he’s a being of pure chaos called into physical form. Which is cool and all, but in the Eddas he’s a Jotunn, with named parents.

Still, that’s part of the fun of playing with myths. You can take what you like and improvise wildly with the rest.

A change I didn’t quite understand was Harris’s treatment of Loki’s sons, Vali and Nari. Their fate in the Eddas is just about the worst thing imaginable, and I’m not sure why Harris shied away from it. Her decision to gloss it over felt like a missed opportunity.

And that one exception to her world-building? It was Asgard, realm of the Æsir and the setting for much of the novel.

I understand the need to modernize these myths, but I think Harris veered a little too far into modernization with Asgard. The realm of the Æsir just wasn’t coherent. Sure, I’ll accept that gods shape-shift and have alternate battle forms. But it’s really pushing my willful suspension of disbelief to think they would say, “Chillax.”

Landscape descriptions in Asgard suffered from a similar problem. Loki says his housing doesn’t have running water, or complains about the curtains in Sigyn’s house, and I’m thinking, “Wait, didn’t these stories take place in pre-history?”

I’m not going to say someone’s depiction of Asgard is wrong, but those details pulled me out of the story and left me scratching my head.

And then there’s the ending.

Obviously I’m not going to tell you how this novel ends. Even I’m not that evil.

And I won’t say I was expecting rainbows and unicorns. The Norse myths themselves don’t exactly have a surplus of rainbows or unicorns. But I felt like Harris was building up to something. There was a fair amount of scheming, some planning, a dash of foreshadowing…

Then it was over.

It wasn’t bad, exactly, but it didn’t quite leave me lying in bed, smoking a cigarette.

So. Lots of good, lots of head-scratching, and a whole hell of a lot of Loki.
12 people found this helpful
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J. Scheppler
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Norse mythology from Loki''s POV
Reviewed in the United States on April 7, 2014
Joanne M. Harris’s The Gospel of Loki is a brilliant reinvigoration of Norse mythology told from the (misunderstood) first person viewpoint of the God of Mischief himself. Harris starts off with Loki’s wickedly funny descriptions of the various Aesir, Vanir, monsters, and... See more
Joanne M. Harris’s The Gospel of Loki is a brilliant reinvigoration of Norse mythology told from the (misunderstood) first person viewpoint of the God of Mischief himself. Harris starts off with Loki’s wickedly funny descriptions of the various Aesir, Vanir, monsters, and demons with whom he will interact in the pages that follow.

Without any real apology for what he gets up to, Harris’s Loki retells all the stories we know and love from Norse mythology, infusing them with the wit, playfulness, and cleverness one expects of the God of Mischief. The humor never lets up, even when the story takes the darker turn you know is inevitable if you know anything at all about Norse mythology. Loki’s punishment and Ragnarok aren’t inherently funny, but Harris imbues her prankster protagonist with an indomitable spirit that doesn’t fail even in his darkest moments.

And while the Loki of Norse mythology is not the Loki of the Marvel Universe, it didn’t hurt that I heard Tom Hiddleston’s Loki voice in every line of this truly delightful adult fantasy.
3 people found this helpful
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Aidan Howell
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Entertaining
Reviewed in the United States on September 16, 2019
This book is entertaining to read and is an interesting take on Norse mythology. I would recommend it to anyone who is a fan of Loki. This book is a bit slow at times, hence why I gave it 3 stars, but still very enjoyable. I think there is a sequal and I plan on reading... See more
This book is entertaining to read and is an interesting take on Norse mythology. I would recommend it to anyone who is a fan of Loki. This book is a bit slow at times, hence why I gave it 3 stars, but still very enjoyable. I think there is a sequal and I plan on reading that sometime in the future.
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Andrew Lawston
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Tricks for a Treat
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 12, 2017
The Gospel of Loki is a delightful book, chronicling the life and times of Loki, the Trickster of Norse mythology, and the rise and fall of Asgard. Loki is a relentlessly wonderful character; an amoral and capricious, but also completely psychologically plausible anti-hero,...See more
The Gospel of Loki is a delightful book, chronicling the life and times of Loki, the Trickster of Norse mythology, and the rise and fall of Asgard. Loki is a relentlessly wonderful character; an amoral and capricious, but also completely psychologically plausible anti-hero, whose antics range from mischief to genocide, across 300 endlessly entertaining pages. There''s a huge cast of characters, with many names familiar to anyone who''s heard a bit of Norse mythology or, let''s not be coy about it, seen a few Marvel films. Generally a Dramatis Personnae at the start of a book is a red flag for pretentious prose ahead, but do read this one fully. There may be a quiz later. Harris''s style is eminently readable, and only strays into being anachronistic when it''s funny to do so. The large cast means we don''t get too close to many of the characters other than Your Humble Narrator, but this also works to help the Gods preserve a bit of their mystery. Despite being his sworn brother, Loki never allows the reader to get too close to Odin, in particular, and the General remains an enigma right up to Ragnarok. Thor and his hammer Mjolnir probably get the most exposure, and his simple approach to life is an effective contrast to Loki''s wrangling. One of the best books I''ve read this year, and I''ve read some really good books this year.
14 people found this helpful
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Judith
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A great Norse retelling
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 29, 2018
I love a retelling, but it can get a little stagnant reading fairy tale retellings all the time so it was very refreshing to read a retelling of Norse mythology. I thought that Loki as a narrator was exceptionally voiced, you got such a strong sense of his outsider nature...See more
I love a retelling, but it can get a little stagnant reading fairy tale retellings all the time so it was very refreshing to read a retelling of Norse mythology. I thought that Loki as a narrator was exceptionally voiced, you got such a strong sense of his outsider nature and it made him feel like more than just a god revelling in mischief, you get a better sense of his nature, of his motivations and his complexities. I should say, I’m going to use ‘he’ as a pronoun for Loki because I think this fits this book best, however, I am aware that a lot of people choose to see Loki as more of a gender-neutral character. In this book, Loki spends most of the story in a ‘male aspect’ so I hope I’m not incorrect in using this pronoun for this particular retelling. I’m quite familiar with a lot of Norse mythology, largely because I absorbed mythology like a sponge when I was younger, but also because I recently read Neil Gaiman’s Norse Mythology which was a good top up. I was familiar with all of the different stories in this volume, there weren’t any surprises. What I thought was really exceptional was the way in which Harris weaves these usually disparate stories into a full narrative, connecting events that would normally be divided into set stories in other compilations. This is a novel, one with a clear beginning, middle and end, and yet it somehow also manages to be a collection of Norse myths. Impressive to say the least. I should say, if you have any particular affection for any Norse gods other than Loki, don’t expect to see them get a glowing recommendation in this book. The side effect of this ‘outsider’ perspective is that pretty much all of the gods seem fairly terrible. This does lead to some amusing observations, and it is nice to see all-powerful deities being ridiculed every once in a while, we all like to see people being taken down a peg or two. As I say, Loki’s voice is incredibly well placed, he could easily have come off as a petulant child or as a totally unrelatable pain in the butt, but Harris manages to strike a happy balance where you know he’s being horrible but you also can’t help but think that he’s right. If you know Norse mythology well or if you’re brand new I think you will enjoy this retelling. Harris manages to create a cohesive story of the Norse myths and gives a new spin on pretty much every character. I would highly recommend grabbing a copy! My rating: 4/5 stars
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Clay R. Haase
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
An engaging take on Norse mythology
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 13, 2014
‘The Gospel of Loki’, by Joanne M. Harris, is a fantasy fiction book focusing on a retelling of Norse mythology from the point of view of Loki. Going through practically all of the events in it through a humorous and thorough way, when I first heard about this book I felt...See more
‘The Gospel of Loki’, by Joanne M. Harris, is a fantasy fiction book focusing on a retelling of Norse mythology from the point of view of Loki. Going through practically all of the events in it through a humorous and thorough way, when I first heard about this book I felt the immediate need to purchase and read it. I’ll further preface this review by saying that mythology has always been something I really enjoy, and Loki is one of the gods I am most interested in. Though I’m not entirely familiar with the classical and original works, ‘the trickster,’ is definitely one of the most enjoyable mythological characters out there. Because of this I had some really high expectations of the book, in part because of what I had previously read on Loki in both mythology and fiction, even though I hadn’t heard of this author before. The book is told by Loki himself, and starts from the time Odin comes across him in his original form of Wildfire from Chaos, tricking him to joining the gods in Asgard. It then advances from there until the very Ragnarok, the story going through all of the events concerning Loki and offering a more ‘personal’ view of these via his point of view. It is clear that the author really knows her mythology from reading ‘The Gospel of Loki’, as practically every myth is included from Loki’s perspective, and her take on the Vanir and Aesir war, as well as Gullvied-Heide is original and brought up some interesting possibilities in understanding the underlying politics and wars involved. However, the thing I liked the most about this book was that it offered the myths from Loki’s point of view without the ‘wicked’ or ‘evil’ points of view that seem to fill most retellings of Norse myths. Overall it was a strong portrayal of Loki as a vivid character and rebel of Asgard, following his psychological development over this in a way I didn’t expect to see. It was interesting to follow and read, and I found myself rooting and hoping for the best for Loki (even though it was more than clear for me that there was no such thing as a good ending possible in this). The narrative in this, contrary to what one my expect of a work of this type; is modern, breeze, and witty, and includes modern slang. This was something I ended up feeling quite mixed on, mostly out of my admiration for Tolkien’s use of prose in his translations of classic works and fantasy books, but it otherwise was enjoyable and fitted the atmosphere put forwards by the author. Despite this, something which remarked me more negatively when reading ‘The Gospel of Loki’ was the attitude that Loki himself had seemingly taken to events. Despite being the star of the show he came across on more than one occasion as boring and whiny. A shame, as the mythological figure itself seems to hardly be either of those things. In addition, I didn’t quite manage to understand why the author felt it like a necessity to attach runes to every god, as it wasn’t fully explained and seemed to work against her as the plot progressed. Further, it seemed that in the end the myths presented suffered from a lack of development for other characters, which weren’t too develop in comparison to Loki himself. This was something I really missed by the end of it, which combined with the narrative style chosen made me miss the fact that this book wasn’t longer. Overall, ‘The Gospel of Loki’ has some definite good and bad points, but succeeds in being entertaining to read. It presents Norse mythology in an engaging way that makes this book perfect to read for anyone who doesn’t have much knowledge of Norse mythology, and is impossible to get lost in, and I fully recommend it in this sense. For more experienced readers, it is certainly worth reading if only because of the particular point of view it puts across, but it might seem lacking in the end due to its length and choice of approach to the myths. It certainly achieves 4 stars, and won’t disappoint if what you’re expecting when purchasing this book is an introduction of sorts to Norse mythology or just something to pass time with. For a more experienced reader I’d recommend to purchase with care, as the entertainment value of the book itself will definitely vary from person to person.
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James
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
An attempt at a new take on the Norse myths that doesn''t quite come off
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 14, 2020
Harris tells a variety of Norse myths, linking them together in a narrative from the perspective of Loki. The original aspects of the story read like a sensational tell-all magazine interview which grew tiresome quite quickly. The narrative also didn''t really work for me....See more
Harris tells a variety of Norse myths, linking them together in a narrative from the perspective of Loki. The original aspects of the story read like a sensational tell-all magazine interview which grew tiresome quite quickly. The narrative also didn''t really work for me. Some of the myths have Loki being a valued member of the gods, so Harris had to explain his motivations with respect to how he was set up as an antagonist to the Aesir. The effect was unconvincing; it felt confused and lacking coherence. As a result, the book was ultimately a bit of a let down.
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Tracy
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Norse Mythology at its finest
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 14, 2018
Wow, I read this book in 3 days, every moment free, read it. This is the tale of Loki from his viewpoint. No spoilers here, don''t want to take away your joy. This book is riveting, funny, sad, strong, and more. It takes mythology to a whole new level. Having only read Greek...See more
Wow, I read this book in 3 days, every moment free, read it. This is the tale of Loki from his viewpoint. No spoilers here, don''t want to take away your joy. This book is riveting, funny, sad, strong, and more. It takes mythology to a whole new level. Having only read Greek mythology, this is my first step into the Norse world. Looking forward to book two.
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